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Today in Labor History

July 31, 1999: The Great Shipyard Strike of 1999 ends after Steelworkers at Newport News Shipbuilding ratify a breakthrough agreement which nearly doubles pensions, increases security, ends inequality, and provides the highest wage increases in company and industry history to nearly 10,000 workers at the yard. The strike lasted 15 weeks.

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'Cesar Chavez' Showcases Power of Union Organizing, Immigrant Labor
Posted On: Apr 01, 2014
April 1, 2014 | LABOR HISTORY | The 1960s struggle of migrant farmworkers in California played out against many other political movements of the time. Long hours, brutal conditions and lower-than-minimum wages provided the impetus for the great grape strike and boycott, centered in Delano, Calif. The campaign, led by Chavez and Dolores Huerta, the co-founders of the National Farm Workers Association, lasted more than five years and involved hundreds of miles-long marches, nearly month-long hunger strikes and brutal police violence. Full story at alternet.org.
 
 
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