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Today in Labor History

October 23, 2001
Postal workers Joseph Curseen (left) and Thomas Morris Jr, die after inhaling anthrax at the Brentwood mail sorting center in Washington, D.C. Other postal workers are made ill. Letters containing the deadly spores had been addressed to U.S. Senate offices and media outlets. Union Communication Services

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How The Supreme Court is Invoking a 1925 Law to Restrict Workers’ Rights Today
Posted On: May 24, 2018
May 24, 2018 | WAR ON WORKERS | In 1925, at the behest of New York merchants, Congress passed the Federal Arbitration Act to uphold as "valid, irrevocable and enforceable" the contracts they had negotiated for shipping and delivering goods. They agreed to settle disputes through private arbitration, which was seen as quicker and cheaper than going to court. When labor interests voiced objection, Commerce Secretary Herbert Hoover proposed an amendment to make clear the law did not involve workers. "Nothing herein contained shall apply to contracts of employment of seamen, railroad employees or any other class of workers engaged in foreign or interstate commerce," it said. …Scholars who have looked into the 1925 law find it remarkable that an obscure and narrowly focused measure has taken on such importance. Los Angeles Times
 
 
Teamsters Local 992
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